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The top 20 dumplings in Toronto by type

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dumplings Toronto

There’s an entire world of dumplings waiting to be discovered in Toronto. From slippery steamed varieties to crispy deep-fried delicacies, here’s a cross-cultural array of doughy pockets that are ready for you to devour.

Accra
Haitian snack bar Rhum Corner is the place to go to find these deep-fried malanga fritters, which come served with slaw and a tangy mayo.

Bao
You can find steamed bun sandwiches stuffed with fried chicken or pork belly on menus citywide. Banh Mi Boysand Mean Bao are two popular bao spots, though they’re hardly alone.

Coxinhas
Teardrop-shaped croquettes are big in Brazil and they’re also a menu favourite at Parkdale’s Mata Petisco Bar, which serves deep-fried minced chicken dumplings alongside malagueta pepper aioli.

Gnudi
Truffle gnudi at Rasa are pillows of perfection, especially when paired with walnut pesto and a medley of local mushrooms.

Gyoza
Deep-fried pork dumplings make an excellent side to a piping hot bowl of ramen at Kinton. Although you can also find these Japanese dumplings at almost every other sushi bar and ramen house in town.

Dumplings Toronto

Har Gow
No dim sum experience would be complete without an order of these pleated shrimp dumplings. You’ll find them streaming out of the kitchens in steamer baskets at places such as Kwan and Rol San.

Jamaican Fried Dumpling
The Real Jerk makes golden, deep-fried dumplings with flour, water, butter and milk and pairs them with ox tail gravy, for dipping purposes, of course.

Jiaozi
Mother’s Dumplings should be top of mind if you’re seeking out a broad selection of Chinese dumplings. Among the many varieties, you’ll find these boiled, then pan-fried little pockets packed with pork and dill or pork and bok choi.

Mandu
Satisfy your cravings for Korean dumplings at Cho Sun Ok where bite-sized pockets of pork are available steamed or fried with a soy dipping sauce. Song Cooks’ pork, zucchini and chive mandu are also noteworthy.

Manti
Find these Turkish dumplings on the menu at Anatolia. Here, they come filled with seasoned ground beef and are topped with garlicky yogurt, mint, clarified butter and a dash of paprika.

Momos
Fill up on Tibetan dumplings in Parkdale, a.k.a Little Tibet. Loga’s Corner both steams and fries these doughy beef or veggie dumplings. When indulging, nibble off a corner to release some steam and then devour the rest in a few bites.

dumplings Toronto

Khinkali
Georgian-style pouches of minced meat are standouts on the menu at the The Ossington Stop. Among a late night menu of sloppy sandwiches, these $2.50 pockets are a treasure if you’re looking to snack on something comforting and cheap.

Kreplach
You can find ground meat and potato-filled Jewish soup dumplings swimming in soothing bowls of steaming chicken broth at the New Yorker Deli.

Papa Rellena
Cuban potato puffs stuffed with picadillo or a medley of mushrooms and vegetables are a menu favourite atJulie’s Cuban.

Pelmeni
Pravda Vodka Bar doles out these plump pillows stuffed with veal in a wild mushroom broth with sour cream and chives.

dumplings Toronto

Pierogi
Dumplings filled with beef or potato and cottage cheese are among the traditional offerings at Hasting’s Snack Bar. For adventurous riffs, head to the Saucy Pierogi where the rotating menu features pierogi stuffed with foodstuffs like kimchi, sauerkraut and mushrooms, jerk chicken and pulled pork.

Siu Mai
A must-have when visiting dim sum parlours like Dim Sum King are these open-faced dumplings, which traditionally reveal a mix of pork and mushroom popping out of a thin wrapper.

Tortellini
The iconic Italian pasta is a standard at red sauce restaurants and are a common sight in supermarkets. Find an elevated offering at Cafe Bar Pasta where the hand-pinched pasta rings come filled with white truffle pecorino and are topped with silky pecorino broth.

Wontons
Jim Chai Kee tops our list of best wonton soup in Toronto. This accolade can be credited to the massive and delicious shrimp wontons on the menu.

Xiao Long Bao
These delicate soup dumpling are a dim sum staple. Find them at the eponymous Xiao Long Bao where favourites come packed with crab meat and pork.

POTSTICKERS

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Homemade potstickers are easier to make than you think, and they taste 10000x better than the store-bought ones!

Potstickers - Homemade potstickers are easier to make than you think, and they taste 10000x better than the store-bought ones!

Growing up in a very Korean household, we had homemade potstickers at least once a week – steamed, fried, boiled, kimchi filling, mushroom filling, shrimp filling…you name it. So it’s no surprise that I always have to order a plate of potstickers when we eat out at an Asian restaurant. But at the end of the day, nothing will ever beat homemade potstickers.

Potstickers - Homemade potstickers are easier to make than you think, and they taste 10000x better than the store-bought ones!

Potstickers - Homemade potstickers are easier to make than you think, and they taste 10000x better than the store-bought ones!

Potstickers - Homemade potstickers are easier to make than you think, and they taste 10000x better than the store-bought ones!

The best thing about homemade potstickers is that it’s so easy to put together and you can completely customize the fillings. I’ve made shrimp potstickers before so I tried something a little different with a pork filling with tons of shiitake mushrooms. But feel free to use your favorite kind of protein, although I’ve found that pork really creates a more tender filling than any other kind of ground meat. You can even add in your favorite veggies that you have on hand!

Potstickers - Homemade potstickers are easier to make than you think, and they taste 10000x better than the store-bought ones!

You can even make a huge batch  of potstickers and pop them right in the freezer – that way you can indulge in your Asian food cravings whenever you want! Just be sure to freeze them on a baking sheet first before throwing them into a freezer bag. When you’re ready to eat, you can toss them right onto the skillet without thawing, although cooking time may be longer than usual.

Potstickers - Homemade potstickers are easier to make than you think, and they taste 10000x better than the store-bought ones!

So there you have it – easy homemade potstickers with customizable fillings that you can make ahead of time and freeze. Now who still wants store-bought potstickers?!

Potstickers - Homemade potstickers are easier to make than you think, and they taste 10000x better than the store-bought ones!

Chicken Potstickers

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There was a time when approximately half of my diet consisted of potsticker wrappers. Not full potstickers — just the doughy outsides that had been flavored with juicy innards. Doughy potstickers whose fillings were held together like a little meatball were the easiest to eat and therefore the best. Those with mushy fillings that exploded everywhere when you unwrapped them made my shit list (though I was four, so it wasn’t actually called my shit list).

Since the day I could say thoy thauce — that’s “soy sauce” with a lisp — my favorite potstickers have been my mother’s. Which is unusual because she’s my Jewish parent…my dad’s the Chinese one. He may be why I have a deep love for Chinese food in the first place, but sometime early on, my mother took a dim sum class and came up with a recipe for unbelievable potstickers.

My family makes them every year for Chrismukkah at our annual Dumplings of the World festival. The festival typically consists of a rotating selection of five or six dumplings. We’ve made bao, empanadas, gnocchi — anything doughy. We often try new recipes, but one constant of the menu is these potstickers. Everyone loves them.

And we wouldn’t dare go near store bought wrappers. Our wrappers are thick, and they house a gingery chicken filling that holds itself together if you’re just going for the dough.

For me, nothing says the holidays like folding my own potstickers and then eating as many as I can while watching The Santa Claus for the trillionth time.

Makes about 20 

For the wrappers:

2 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
1/2 cup boiling water
1/2 cup cold water

For the filling:

1 pound ground chicken
2 teaspoons each: sugar, soy sauce, and rice vinegar
Black pepper to taste
1 teaspoon ground ginger
2 stalks green onion, minced
1/4 cup chicken broth
1 pinch red chili flakes
Oil for frying the potstickers (I use canola)